Part One

You’re proudly displaying your beautiful finished object to the world when a friend, swooning over your latest make, laments – “oh this is stunning, I wish I could knit”. 

How often do you hear that refrain? We hear this many times a week, and not just online.

Here on the blog we’ll document the progress of one such I wish I could knitter – our very own, Jane Hunter.

We follow Jane’s thoughts on acquiring the tools, yarns and notions, which resources she uses, learning the basics and developing her skills as a knitter.

As Kate is currently unwell you will hear more from other members of KDD & Co. over the coming months. 

Let’s all welcome Jane to the knitting community!


Hi everyone, Jane here.

It was inevitable!

Having known Kate for a few years, working with her and Tom on the book Inspired by Islay, joining the KDD team last year, and as a textile artist, the lure of creating my own fabric was difficult to resist.

Following a busy few years professionally, I have decided to pick up a different type of needle to begin learning to knit.

I’m making regular entries in my journal to document the things I learn along the way.

Like so many, I was introduced to knitting as a child. Aged around seven or eight years old, my great grandmother and great aunt Betty would sit with me, help me cast on and make my first few rows of stitches. I don’t remember ever having a finished object and I haven’t knitted since, but I do think back on that memory with fondness. That was thirty years ago. 

So, how do I get started after all this time? What do I need?

Kate has kindly given me: 

  • a set of circular needles,
  • a copy of PomPom KNITHOW book,
  • some yarn.
Image of journal, knitting needles, Haar (grey) Buachaille wool yarn and Pomp Pom Knithow Book.

This is all I need to begin with. As I open the book for the first time I get the impression that it seems quite clear for a beginner. It covers the real basics with clear illustrations, small steps, and no jargon. It explains knitting terminology and abbreviations.

I take my skein of yarn and wind it into a ball, ready to begin knitting. 

Yellow and Grey Buachaille Wool Yarn made in Britain

The book guides me through the knitted cast on and I realised once I started that this is filed in my memory somewhere. Like a muscle memory. 

I cast on 20 stitches fairly easily, but as I begin to knit I feel the wire of the circular needle is flicking around and getting in the way. It’s making it difficult to get into a rhythm. After a few rows I stop and frog the work!

New term – frogging: ripping the stitches out.

Aargh! That’s it. Internet, save me. As KNITHOW recommends – I’ve ordered two sets of bamboo  needles at 5mm and 6mm. Kate had assured me that circular needles would be all I need – she knits almost everything on circular needles. 

(I’ll come back to circular needles in a later post)

Bamboo Knitting Needles with sample knitting and yellow wool yarn

With my new bamboo needles, I cast on 30 stitches on the 5mm, and found my stitches felt a bit tight. After several rows of knitting I tried to adjust the tightness (tension). I think I’m holding the yarn too tight. Loosening up a bit has helped. I switch to purling a few rows. The transition felt a wee bit confusing to start with and I think I dropped a few stitches as some holes appear in the fabric. However, I have fabric!

Switching back to knit stitch, it feels more intuitive now. I’m developing a rhythm and not having to think too much about it. I’m even watching/glancing at the TV in the corner as I knit.

I tried “picking” instead of “throwing” for a bit. It feels weird, but I felt it important to try at the outset. Trying to figure out whether it is more natural/easier to knit in the Continental style as opposed to English style. (These terms are explained in the book). I’ll stick with English style, my working yarn coming from the right. 

Over the course of the next week I continue to practise the knit stitch and the purl stitch. I’m excited to learn that these two simple stitches used in different combinations can create a whole range of fabrics. 

Garter stitch – using knit stitch row after row, or purling row after row – makes a soft, spongy fabric.

Ribbing – knitting one stitch, purling one stitch, knitting one stitch. makes a stretchy fabric like you see on the neck and cuffs of many sweaters.

Stocking stitch – one row of knit, followed by one row of purl, followed by one row of knit – is a revelation! This makes a flatter fabric which most of my knitted sweaters are made from.

Jane Hunter sits on the couch knitting with bamboo needles, yellow wool yarn and a learn to knit book.

I’ve now taken to inspecting all the knitted garments I, or my family, have to see how they are constructed.

This is how my first week of knitting panned out:

There were dropped stitches, loose stitches, tight cast on and a few naughty words. At one point I discovered an extra four stitches on the needle. I don’t even know how that happened. I felt that learning ribbing with an even number of stitches on the needles wasn’t going to work, but I’ve since learned that this is nonsense, because I hadn’t learned to “read” my knitting yet.

After a few days working on a commission in my studio, I came back to the knitting and had to look at the book again to refresh my memory of the basic knit and purl movements. The first few rows were a mess. I was beginning to wonder what I was doing wrong. Why is my knitting so baggy and weird? Have I forgotten everything in just a couple of days? After a while of considering whether this knitting lark is for me, I realised that the empty needle I had picked up was the 6mm and not the 5mm I had started on. I’m now knitting on two different sized needles!

Stocking stitch sampler knitted in yellow 100% wool yarn. My very first piece of knitting.

Eventually, I get back on track and have a decent chunk of stockinette which I’m quite pleased with. Now for the cast off. For some reason I was a bit daunted about casting off. As it happens, it was so easy. And satisfying.

The last step was to block the work. Leaving it in a bowl of wool wash for fifteen minutes, gently squeezing, and drying overnight on a towel to allow me to check my gauge with the 5mm needles and Buachaille yarn.

I’m remembering Kate’s previous post about swatching and gauge and how needle size is immaterial, so I want to record in my journal, for future reference that:

5mm bamboo needles + Buachaille 2 ply, worsted spun, wool yarn = 18 stitches over 4 inches.

My first knitted sample. Jane holds up a yellow and grey wool sample she has just knitted.

In my next post I’ll begin my first project, swatching, trying another set of needles, learning to troubleshoot and what I think of my first finished object.

In the meantime, if you are considering learning to knit, or would like to encourage someone to do so – we have copies of PomPom’s KNITHOW available in the shop

121 thoughts on “I wish I could knit

  1. Dearest Kate,
    I wondered if you were unwell, as the posts had dried up a bit. Although I absolutely love them (this is coming from a non-knitter who simply finds your journey and your designs and your thoughts inspiring and uplifting), I would hate for you to feel any pressure to keep them up when it is difficult. You have come to mean a great deal to me, and I really, sincerely, hope that this is simply an episode of ill-heath that will pass in due course and see you well and thriving again soon. All the best to you and your family x

    Like

  2. Fantastic i have sent a copy of the PomPom to my sister who wants to learn, thank you Jane warm regards Patricia

    Like

  3. Where can I check out – and maybe buy – ‘PomPom Knit How’? I cannot find it anywhere. Sounds interesting, but possibly to basic for me. Many thanks, Carole.

    Like

  4. So wonderful that you are knitting, Jane. Beware though because its totally addictive. :) Enjoy…
    Sending my very best wishes to Kate. I do hope you are feeling better!

    Like

  5. Lovely to hear your story, Jane! It’s always interesting to see how people learn new skills, what is easy, what is challenging. You captured with such detail your journey! It was such a pleasure to read. Thank you.

    Best wishes to Kate for healing!! I’m so glad she has such a wonderful team of supportive and caring family/friends to help her through this latest challenge in addition to all of the lovely well-wishes from makers around the world. xo

    Like

  6. Welcome aboard Jane! Knitting needles are so personal, and the needs change over the years. I started with shortish ones, then moved to very long ones, then on to circulars, then wood, then interchangeables. I am now pruning my circulars and only use them for hats and socks. I’m back on short needles as I find they balance better for me.

    Sending good wishes to Kate. Take as long as you need to get back to full strength.

    Like

    1. Your stitches are nice and even, you’re a knitter!
      Try a moss stitch swatch, very simple, gives a lovely soft knobbly texture – cast on any odd number of stitches, and simply knit one, purl one every row, for whatever length you want. It’s like doing rib, but the odd number of stitches means you’re one stitch off, and the result is nothing like rib – it’s like moss in fact! I made wee jacket and trouser suits in this stitch for Hazel when she was a baby, and more recently have made 5 or 6 neck warmers, quite snug, not as long therefore not as loose as a cowl, and cosier and very quick to knit – I’ve been using up thicker yarns this way, Aran and chunky etc., with the appropriate needles, and friends I’ve given them to got great use of them during last year’s Beast from the East spell. When you have a spare day, I’ll take you to a lovely wee knitting café in Glasgow, home-made cakes, good tea and coffee, and everyone’s knitting or crocheting, discussing problems and sharing tips.
      You’ll need to let me see Kate’s wool xx

      Like

  7. Wishing Jane good luck (and patience )!

    Wishing Kate peace, love, and healing—remember: you are made of tough stuff! Thank you for showing us your quiet (and not-so-quiet) strength in and out of vulnerability, sharing your knowledge and talent, and for generally being a kick-ass human. Take care!

    Like

  8. Hello Jane – and thank you for this post. As others have said, it is great to have the blog back with my Sunday morning coffee, but also I found I have recently lost my knitting passion. This post inspired me to find my journal and cast on my socks (again – 3rd time. Whoever thought ribbing could be so problematic, right?). Many thanks for sharing your experiences!

    Like

  9. Jane, congratulations on taking the leap into knitting! I recently went “back” to straight needles for projects knitted flat in pieces…..they let my shoulders relax….I seem to be able to knit longer with less fatigue! Of course, I’ll use circulars when required! It’s good to have different tools in your repertoire….prevent repetitive motion injury :)

    Best wishes to Kate….and all at KDD.

    Like

  10. Thank you Jane. I have been knitting since my mother bought me my Christmas present at age 13 years, it was a pattern of a faire isle twin set, including the yarn and needles. I still have a photograph of me wearing the finished garment at school. I am now in my mid eighties.
    I look forward to seeing your instructions on how to use circular knitting needles as I have never worked with them and would like to.
    Best wishes Kate for your recovery. Your messages have been sorely missed.
    Thanks also to all members of KDD.
    Jeanne Adam

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Jane I just love your work…reading your blog took me down memory lane,especially the two size needles🤣 We have all been there. The best thing about knitting is the journey! Sending healing thoughts to Kate and thinking of all of you💕

    Like

  12. Thank you for this post! I think of Kate, Tom, Bruce and Bobby every day and send warm positive wishes their way! Take care of yourself Kate and know that you reside in the hearts of many of us!

    Julie

    Like

  13. What an excellent start to an extremely beautiful experience. With Kate as your guide, you are in very knowledgeable hands and I’m sure this is something you will love doing for many years to come. It’s never harder than at the first moment.

    Like

  14. I was so please to receive a message from KDD
    I do hope that kate will be fine as soon as possible
    I miss so much her post and to see her, Tom and the dogs, of course!!
    get well Kate
    all my love to everybody from france

    Like

  15. Hi Jane,
    Well done for all the application, determination and wonderful progress. I had a similar ‘knitting’ start to you, and only began again over 2 years ago at about 60. I’m now loving it, and part way through my first fair isle jumper – although it has taken nearly 2 years so far, but I have done socks and an ordinary-ish jumper, too, in that time. NB I learned to ‘pick’ with my left hand, so I can have my 2 ‘f.i.’ wools in different hands. It wasn’t too hard to do and makes ord knitting easier, too.
    NB Supportive thoughts to Kate, hope she recovers with time, love and cast-iron, self-belief. NB I’m a retired/ex-Eng Lit academic (via a difficult route) tho’ still writing & researching: originally from a very poor, wc family.

    Like

  16. There is that delicious quote from Jane Austen’s Persuasion…”she taught me to knit which has been a great amusement”. It is so lovely to hear from the KDD & Co. blog that Jane is knitting now! Wishing everyone at KDD all good things, and to Kate a healthful spring and summer with blessed creativity, and to the pups (yes, I mean you two) joyful walks and belly rubs.

    Like

  17. Sorry to hear you’re unwell Kate and I wish you a speedy recovery. Thank you Jane for continuing to post and well done for learning to knit. I have knitted since my mum taught me at the age of 4 and it has been the one of the things which has helped me through my husband’s dementia and since he died 2 years ago. I have also joined a couple of craft groups. I look forward to seeing more posts of your progress and news of Kate.

    Like

  18. Beautiful start Jane! Your sample is a good example of why I like knit and purl designs so much. They bring out the beauty of the yarn and let the texture shine. Just a few rows of yarnover eyelets (which you will easily learn soon enough) every now and then and you can have a interesting, complex-looking fabric with very little effort. Of course it helps that the yarn is something like Buachaille:-).

    Kate, I hope you know that you have a whole world of people who love you and wish you a speedy and happy recovery. You are an inspiration to all of us.

    Like

  19. Let’s be honest, of all the people who say “I wish I could knit”, for most of them they don’t really have the interest or motivation and would probably also say, if you pushed them to learn, that they don’t have the time either (too busy doing less important things).
    If someone really wants to learn to do any craft, it has never been easier with all the YouTube how-to videos and blogs such as this. They might like the idea of being able to knit, but to make a little effort and learn is a whole different matter.

    Like

  20. So sorry to hear you’re unwell, Kate. I wondered why the blogs had slowed down! You’re an inspiration on every front, and hopefully all the good vibes coming back to you will help speed your recovery. I’ve recently made your St Catherine’s, and am on my second Carbeth – which I just LOVE. Fabulous techniques – no sewing! Welcome Jane! Oh, how I recognise everything you’ve described – hang in there!

    Like

  21. Dear Kate,

    I am sorry to hear that you are unwell and wish you a speedy recovery. You have done much to uplift the knitting scene and we are all so appreciative-Get well soon-we miss you!

    Like

  22. This is very inspirational, thanks for sharing Jane! As a newbie knitter myself, with what sometimes feels like a distant goal to be able to knit more advanced designs and patterns (it’s been all sock bonanza for me up til now) it’s fun to hear from someone on my own level. I’m very much looking forward to your guide into knitting. I hope you enjoy your start as much as I have.
    Also best wishes for Kate’s recovery! It was a picture of her design Strathendrick that made me join the knitting world a few months back. I just felt I had to learn how to create something as beautiful as that! So many thanks for being an inspiration to me and many others! xo

    Like

    1. Asa when I was new I tried to learn one new thing with each project. I now can do the more advanced projects, because all the techniques add up💕

      Like

  23. It was so great to get a notification from KDD this morning, I have missed them so much. So welcome to you Jane and to the wonderful world of knitting. Kate is very much in my thoughts, in fact, all of them are! There must be so many positive vibes making their way to Scotland from knitters worldwide that hopefully their effect will result in Kate’s return to full health very, very soon. But don’t come back too soon Kate, we can all wait 😘

    Like

  24. Hi Jane,
    Lovely to hear from you and welcome to the world of knitting. If your other work is anything to go by, your knitting will be amazing! You are such a talented artist.
    Please pass on my best wishes to Kate. I have so missed her wise words. I only know her from her work and blog, but I hope she realizes that she is loved around the world.

    Like

  25. Welcome to the wonderful world of knitting. I learnt to knit as a child, then after years picked up needles again in my teens, then in my 20’s and after many years in my 40’s, it’s a skill once mastered you never loose and it brings such joy not just in the making of something but as you learn to relax and just enjoy the rhythm of it. I hope this is the start of a life long love of knitting for you, and look forward to sharing your journey.

    I’m also sending lots of good wishes to Kate and hope she gets well soon.

    Like

    1. While in Scotland for EYF I took a bus tour to Loch Lomand. We stepped off the bus and there was the strong little tree you have photographed so often. I threw my coat and bag on the ground and ran to the water’s edge calling to my friend “It’s Kate’s tree!” She thought I was crazy but it was a definite high point for me. I found a heart shaped pebble on the shore and tucked it in my pocket. Took a photo of myself in her Blaithin sweater beside the tree.
      Please give my best to Kate, we miss her so.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Welcome to the gang, Jane! It’s a pleasure to welcome another knitter to the yarniverse, get an email from Kate Davies Designs (it’s been a while!!) & also-of course- wish Kate wellness & healing.
    Nathalie

    Like

  27. I saved this post to enjoy reading it at the end of my day and really enjoyed reading and being reminded of starting to knit. I dare not count how many needles I have now.
    Welcome to ‘just one more row’ Jane. The photos are excellent too and show your swatch so clearly. KDD&co blog has been the highlight of my day.
    Caring thoughts to Kate and thank you for blogging today

    Like

  28. Hi Jane,

    I think we can all relate to your learning experience, at least I know I can! Thank you for sharing and I look forward to following along with you on your journey.

    I am so sorry to hear that Kate is not well. Sending her best wishes for a full and speedy recovery.

    Like

  29. Really lovely post Jane. Hope Kate is getting all the rest she needs and looking forward to seeing her posts when she is fully recovered.

    Like

  30. Jane this all looks excellent. I think the clue comes early on when you talk about muscle memory- it really does get easier! You are so familiar with lots of elements of working with textiles that once you get going you will be producing lovely things, all your own. Look forward to seeing what you produce. Please send all best wishes to Kate and Tom – she has been much in the minds of many many people

    Like

  31. Welcome to the wonderful world of knitting Jane. You won’t believe it yet but it is a very therapeutic pastime! You will soon have your first Carbeth jumper or cardigan finished.
    I am so pleased to have an email from KDD in my inbox again. I think it has been a wee while since we heard from Kate herself so I do hope Kate feels better very soon.
    My best wishes to you all, especially Kate.

    Like

  32. Thank you Jane! I am now 60 years old and have picked up knitting again now that I am recently retired from teaching. I had not knitted or crocheted since high school with my Grandmother. It as a slow tedious start but now I am knitting all the time and hardly want to put it down!
    I am a follower of Kate in North Carolina U.S.A. and have been missing Kate’s posts. I didn’t know that she has been unwell and I was so happy to see an e-mail from KDD today. Kate, you will be in my prayers. Thank you so much for all of your inspiration for fiber folks all over the world. Sarah

    Like

  33. It’s lovely to see you knitting Jane! I knitted on straight needles for years, even though I now prefer circulars. Lovely yarn and the right tools for you makes such a difference. I’m looking forward to your further adventures in knitting.

    Like

  34. Hi Jane, it is great to have a fellow novice in the KDD community since I always imagine everyone else is an expert. I have proudly made several of Kate’s projects and, without anyone else remotely knitterly around me, have found Youtube invaluable – but then you are surrounded by brilliant advice.
    Above all, I join the throng of others wishing you well Kate.

    Like

    1. It’s brilliant, you can find the answer to almost any issue somewhere online. I have spent a LOT of time watching tutorials – I find them quite relaxing too!

      Like

  35. Welcome Jane to the wonderful world of knitting and collecting yarn from all over the world. It was nice to see someone learning to knit and accomplishing it on the very first project.
    Hopefully, Kate will be on the mend soon and back to give you a helping hand.
    Great post!

    Like

  36. Well done Jane – before long it will feel like you have been knitting for ever. Lovely to have such gorgeous yarn to start with – I’m old enough to remember the nasty synthetics that we were taught with back in the day! Looking forward to hearing from members of the team over the coming months, and hoping of course that Kate’s health is improving.

    Like

  37. Dear Jane,
    I am so glad to hear of a new knitter’s journey in this blog, but thinking about Kate and wishing her a speedy recovery. My mom and cousin really encouraged me to use circulars, too, but at first I didn’t like it, although it was a superior way to knit. I found a fabulous circular needle with no memory in the cable between needles, and that did the trick! They are ChiaoGoo circular needles (with a red cable), and quite inexpensive. The best circular needles ever. No tugging or unpleasant fiddling. I wish you luck and pleasure on your journey, and I am sending healing rays to Kate, for a speedy recovery.

    Like

  38. Your sample looked pretty good Jane, it has taken me years to keep a constant tension. I’ve never knitted a sleeved sweater for myself but Kate’s designs are inspiring me to have a go.

    I am so sorry to hear that Kate is unwell and do so hope it is nothing serious. I found her book Handyman was such a fascinating read, I have loaned it out to several friends and recommended it to more.

    I’ve just finished a two year clinical trial with great success after living with a blood cancer for the last twenty years – so tell Kate to hang on in there, we are all rooting for her. If wishes came true she would be skipping never mind knitting.

    Like

    1. Thank you Kate. I think I just need to relax a bit and the tension will hopefully sort itself out. You should try some sleeves, I’m sure they would be great!

      Wonderful news about your clinical trial, I’m so pleased this has been successful for you. – Jane

      Like

  39. Thanks for sharing, Jane. So many of your reflections resonate with the Knitting Season essays and assignments on creative practice – and isn’t a ‘beginners mind’ a great asset, despite the occasional frustrations of beginners fingers.

    As others have said, it’s lovely to have the KDD (&co) blog back. Please keep posting – it would be so good to hear from Tom and Mel too, when you have time.

    Warmest wishes to Kate – and to all the KDD team. xxx

    Like

  40. Welcome aboard, Jane! Your FO is great — such even stitches! Hang on to it and treasure it forever! Your lovely post brings back memories of my early knitting days — I was such a tight knitter that sometimes I could not knit the next stitch because there was no room to insert the needle or even move my needles enough to do it!

    Like

  41. Loved reading your post Jane!!!

    I hope Kate is feeling better and is on the mend! How is she doing?

    sending lots of love,
    Jennifer

    Like

  42. So pleased to see KDD drop into my inbox today, and this post has brought back many happy memories of learning to knit when I was a very small girl, more than 35 years ago now although I can still remember the tension dramas of too tight stitches and the sound of yarn squeaking as I tried to get the needle into the stitch … ho hum. Also have a history of too few finished objets d’knit, a lot of frogging and assorted four letter words. You’ve reminded me that keeping a record of swatch notes is really helpful, and a discipline I’m going to start now in earnest thanks to this post. Happy knitting …

    Like

    1. oooh the squeaking stitches, a painful sound.
      I’m very much enjoying keeping record of my swatches, which are thankfully improving with time.
      Happy knitting to you too! – Jane

      Like

  43. Oh my, another knitter ‘down the slippery slope’….actually, errors are a good way to learn and ‘read’ your work. Happy to have you on board. Still worried and missing Kate…….regards and prayers to her please.

    Like

  44. Wonderful new blog from Jane. Looking forward to more from her.

    As has everyone on this mailing list, I want to wish rapid and complete healing to Kate. You are sorely missed in our knitting world! Looking forward to your return to us.

    Rebecca

    Like

  45. My name is Betty and I’m teaching my grand niece how to knit. Unfortunately, it is a ‘long distance’ class as she is in North Carolina, US and I am in Kentucky, US. Your story is similar to mine as I learned from and Aunt Joyce when I was a child.I’ve been knitting now for 40 years. What a legacy we leave! Good on YOU!

    Like

  46. Dear Kate,

    I hope you will soon be well and that the lovely Scottish air will help.

    All the best
    Eleanor

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

  47. Welcome Jane! I love your work, so I’m very excited to see how you translate to knitting. Lovely to have a good post to read this morning with my coffee. I’m looking forward to seeing new develpments from KDD and Co! My best to Kate, and good wishes for speedy recovery!!

    Liked by 1 person

  48. welcome to the world of yarn, color and fun. Soon you will be swooning over beautiful yarn, feeling it and sniffing it and loving it. Now that you are learning how to knit the world is your oyster, color, texture and feel become you go words to describe your latest masterpiece.

    Like

  49. I’m so glad you have started! I hope you enjoy it as much as I do. At first it is difficult to relax and have fun, but you will soon if you stay with it.

    I have knit since i was nine, was knitting cable sweaters by age 17, and have taught knitting for decades. The best advice I can offer beginners is:

    Knit a little every single day. Even if it is only for five minutes. But better is to pick up your knitting a couple of times a day for a few minutes.

    Those of us who try to learn once or twice a week, forget much in between! Picking your needles up often lets you build upon what you learn each time, without sliding backwards. Knitting often also helps you to relax while knitting.

    I have been busy and this is the first I have heard of Kate’s illness. I hope she will recover quickly.

    And now… back to my own knitting… I’m on the button band of a Eunny Jang cardigan and almost done… WOOHOOO!!!!
    :D

    Like

  50. It’s great having KDD back! And I did enjoy your story, Jane. How exciting it is to be setting out on a new venture, one that will give so much back to you. I have just finished a lopi sweater for my DH and it’s wonderful to see him wear it: it fits so well and the colours suit him. And he’s so proud to be wearing something I knit!
    I hope Kate is improving, and knows about all the love out here winging its way towards her.

    Like

  51. Welcome Jane and thank you for sharing your first steps down the rabbit hole! I’m sure, as a textile artist already, you are going to have great fun. Please say hello to Kate from me and send her my love. Susie

    Like

  52. Happy to read your post and have communication from the KDD gang!! Welcome to knitting! Loved your honest posting-even after knitting for years, though on and off, I often consult the YouTube gods over and over and over again to figure out something new. Will look forward to hearing about your progress!!

    Like

  53. How lovely to hear from you Jane and to see and hear about your knitting journey. It does me good to be reminded of the struggles new knitters have (which of course we have all had) and also to see the joy as you show your understanding and your new ability to create things.
    Sending warm wishes to all at KDD&Co

    Like

  54. Welcome Jane!
    Your knitting piece is wonderful for a first time, Bravo!
    And I hope that Kate will feel much more better very soon!

    Like

  55. Hooray for you! Thanks for letting us share your journey into knitting! I think your swatch looks wonderful. Yeah, there are mistakes, but your fabric and stitches look so even and seeing it makes me think again how wonderful the Buachaille yarn is. Re the circulars: bravo to you for knowing what didn’t work and finding something that did.

    Greetings to you and the whole KDD team, and healing thoughts to Kate!

    Like

  56. I’m going to show my non knitter daughter this post – hope it will encourage her and she’ll stop relying on mother for her hand knitted garments!

    Like

  57. Well done, just back at knitting after a break but now have a stash and the rabbit hole has me big time. Have had a new finger joint and I can hardly wait for it to heal wool awaits.
    Love and healing to Kate looking forward to ur next blog annie

    Like

  58. Hiya Jane,
    Best wishes on your newest crafting adventure. With a mentor like the lovely Kate you’ll be having fun I no time at all.
    Welcome back lovely Kate, I’ve missed you, the puppies and Tom. hope all is well,
    . Sending virtual hugs to you all.

    Liked by 1 person

  59. Thanks, Jane, this is charming— it made me smile, recalling the early (mostly frustrating) days of my knitting! I look forward to following your journey. Get well wishes to Kate, whom I greatly admire!

    Like

  60. Well done Jane, welcome to the world of knitting … enjoy!! After more years knitting than I care to remember, I still use a few naughty words!! :) And believe me you will get to love those circulars!
    Please pass on my best wishes to Kate!

    Like

  61. Welcome to the wonderful world of knitting. After over 60 years of knitting I still get excited by trying a new technique, a fabulous pattern, a new project. Good luck

    Liked by 1 person

  62. Jane, how exciting to be just starting out on your knitting journey, I wonder where it will take you!
    I love the idea of meeting the other members of the KDD team here on the blog.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’ve been helping my adult daughter develop her knitting. Shes gone fron knitting small crosses to be used as badges for a pilgrimage to scarves and blankets using cables and blackberty stitch to a toy elephant. I no longer get called to every small mistake.
      I havegive her a copy of a 1975 golden hands book Introduction to Knitting i still use.
      I am still learning new techniques such as icord bind off to German part rows and steeks
      You never stop learning and i always resort to knitting when under stress and i hope you find the satisfaction your projects can give

      Like

  63. Dear Jane
    How lovely to read your post and to remind us all how we started … no matter how we have travelled since. I look forward to reading more from you and about your journey.
    I would also like to pass on my very best wishes to Kate who is such an inspiration to me; and to Tom and all the other members of the KDD team.
    Your blog, posts, patterns, photography, yarns, books etc are what help to keep me inspired and challenged knitting-wise from my Alpine home in France!

    Like

  64. First of all, I would like to wish Kate a gentle healing process. We so miss you!!! But now we have Jane! Hello, Jane! What fun it is to see a new knitter being “converted”! Looking forward to following you as you discover the fabulous world of knitting!

    Like

  65. Congratulations, Jane!! You have now fallen down the Rabbit Hole with the rest of us fiber people. When I was 12 years old, my Home Economics teacher taught the class how to knit and purl. I’m sure I’m the only one who carried on with it. So many years ago and so thankful to have my kitting for lovely garments, calm, and serenity!!

    Like

  66. Welcome to the Rabbit hole. It is fun relearning after having done some knitting as a kid. You stitches are lovely and even.

    Like

  67. How exciting! I can just feel the satisfaction of being able to see your own progress and learning something new you enjoy. Much love to Kate and get well soon!

    Liked by 2 people

  68. Welcome Jane!
    Reading your ‘story’ I feel like learning to knit again. Your attention to every little detail makes me look at my needles, yarn and knitting with fresh eyes. What a gift – thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks :-)
        I do, however, feel a little embarrassed. What I need to pick up is a book on the use of the English language.
        My spontaneous phrasing was, I now see, misleading. What I meant to communicate was that when I read your story I felt as if I myself was learning to knit again – even though I have been knitting for more than forty years by now. So – thank you for transporting me back in time and ‘knitting memory’ and for making me approach my knitting as if for the first time again.

        – Marianne (Dane)

        Like

  69. It’s great to have the blog back and to hear from Jane. Thank you so much for sharing your new knitter experiences – I am about to teach some of my family to knit, so I’m sure they will find reading this really helpful. It was so long ago for me I can’t really remember! Enjoy your knitting x

    Liked by 1 person

  70. Hi Jane, so lovely to see a post on here again and welcome to knitting 🧶 😊😊. I really hope that Kate is recovering well as I find her a true inspiration. Looking forward to reading your next post about your knitting journey.

    Rachel xx

    Like

  71. For one happy moment, I thought Kate was back on her feet… I loved reading your contribution though, Jane! I have always found knitting to be one big adventure and I hope yours will give you plenty to entertain us with.

    Kitty

    Liked by 1 person

  72. Welcome to the wonderful world of knitting and loving your journey so far. I have knitted for more years than I care to remember but learn new things all the time; casting on and off, different stitches and ways of knitting. I have a right arm issue at the moment so have just learnt continental style. I like you at first found it impossible but now I find myself knitting faster that way and, more importantly, I can watch telly too now!!! Enjoy learning

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, I hope you’re ok Jennifer. It’s good to hear you have found a way to continue knitting. I’m sure I’ll give continental style another go at some point.
      – Jane

      Like

  73. Well done, Jane! When another teacher and I decided to have a knitting club at school the first efforts were hilarious but wonderful. (We never laughed in front of them.) A 6 stitch, 20 row book mark somehow became a lace fan as they kept doing yarn overs. So we oohed and ahhed and encouraged. Both of us have moved to other schools but I heard the knitting club is still going. That is the best news of all.

    Liked by 1 person

  74. Hello and welcome Jane, recognised your pretty face from the Heids book. When I saw the KDD email I was very happy and hopeful that Kate was back on her feet. It wasn’t Kate but the post was entertaining and very well illustrated (as usual) and I enjoyed it very much.
    Sending Kate my best wishes for a good recovery.

    Liked by 1 person

comment here

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.