Inspiring projects, inspiring patterns

As the summer draws to a close, I thought I’d round up some of the many inspiring projects that have been knitted in recent months from KDD patterns, and show you a couple of new designs in our yarns. Last week, Melanie Berg revealed a stunning shawl in Àrd-Thìr, which reminded me of the beautiful…

Read More

need needles

Do you have any knitting needles to spare? KDD is currently supporting some local community groups who use craft as a tool to tackle social isolation and mental health and we need needles! We are able to provide yarn support, to share our skills, our patterns and ideas, but new knitters also need things to…

Read More

float upstream

Hello! Kate here. It’s time for another release from the Bold Beginner Knits collection – the Upstream pullover. Seamless yoked pullovers are a great first sweater project for a beginner knitter to tackle, and I knew I wanted to include one in this collection. And loving the muted marl-y palette of Àrd-Thìr, I was keen…

Read More

5 weeks of knitting season

We are five weeks in to the Knitting Season Club – a three month exploration of creative making (and handknit design), following a format that’s a little different to previous clubs, with weekly essays and creative assignments as well as the usual collection of new patterns. These essays have been one of the most enjoyable…

Read More

needle size is immaterial

Yes, this is a post in which I reiterate a frequently made point: that while gauge is really important when you are knitting a pattern, needle size is completely immaterial. When you want a hand-knitted item to fit correctly, the only thing that matters is that the fabric you are knitting is as similar as…

Read More

owl stories

You all know that the owl sweater means something to me, and now I know that it means something to you too. Over the past few day, via email, blog comment, or on Instagram, you’ve shared your owl-y stories. I received more than 700 responses across the different platforms and it has been inspiring, moving,…

Read More

owls (from “Handywoman”)

I recently wrote about how I designed the owl sweater in my book Handywoman. As part of the sweater’s ten year owliversary, I thought I’d extract that part of the book here. “In the autumn of 2008, I’d knitted a sweater that lots of people seemed to really like. As my skills and technical acumen…

Read More

Rhinebeck and other sweaters

Isn’t one of the best things about Autumn that it’s sweater weather? I always enjoy seeing knitters around the world wearing my designs, and this enjoyment often comes to a kind of peak around this time of year, when a veritable slew of amazing projects begin to appear on Instagram and Ravelry. I’ve never been…

Read More

making things “locally”

As my business has grown over the past few years I have learned a lot about making things locally. Working with Scottish, Irish, and English producers, I’ve made my own books, and yarn, and knitwear. I’ve collaborated with many different types of manufacturers, from printers and spinners to dyers and wool producers. Being able to…

Read More

two-shade Strathendrick

This sweater has been getting a lot of comments and requests for information – so I thought I’d tell you a bit about it. It’s a simplified two-shade version of my Strathendrick design, which I produced for my West Highland Way book. This sweater says quite a lot about my design process, and the integrality…

Read More

making Handywoman

I initially decided to write Handywoman after being interviewed on BBC Woman’s Hour, which led to a discussion with a literary agent. This agent was really smart, interesting, incredibly professional and represented other writers of what the book trade describes as “intelligent non-fiction” whose work I really admired. I’d had no thought of writing something…

Read More

en-able

I was recently having a chat with an academic pal of mine, who is working on a project looking at changes in the hand-knitting industry over the past few decades. She asked me about how I thought the industry had changed, and what I felt the major differences might be in establishing and running a…

Read More